Medbroadcast  Powered by MediResource
 Search

Go
 Browse alphabetically
ABCDEFGHIJKLMN
OPQRSTUVWXYZ
HEALTH TOPICS
Family & Child Health
Men's Health
Women's Health
Seniors' Health
Addiction
Allergy
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Arthritis (Rheumatoid)
Asthma
Atrial Fibrillation
Baby Health
Back Health
Bedwetting
Bladder (Overactive)
Brain Health
Cancer
Childhood Vaccinations
Cholesterol
Crohn's & Colitis
Cold and Flu
COPD NEW!
Cosmetic Procedures
Depression NEW!
Diabetes
Digestive Health
Ear Health
Eating Disorders
Eye Health
Flu (Seasonal)
Fertility
Fitness
Healthy Skin
Heart
High Blood Pressure
HPV
Hyperhidrosis
Incontinence
Infection
Kidney Health
Lung Health
Medications and your Health
Menopause
Mental Health
Multiple Sclerosis NEW!
Natural and Complementary Therapy
Nutrition
Obesity
Oral Care
Osteoarthritis of the Knee NEW!
Pain
Pregnancy
Psoriasis
Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA)
Seasonal Health
Sexual Health
Sleep Health
Stroke Risk Reduction
Smoking
Weight Management
Workplace Health
Yeast Infection
All health channels

STAY CONNECTED
RESOURCES
Ask an Expert
Clinical Trials
Find a Specialist
Health features
News
Tools


Condition Info Drug Info Tests and Procedures Natural Products Ask an Expert Support Groups Clinical Trials
Home Bookmark Page Send to a Friend Sante Chez Nous Subscribe
Natural Products Info > F > Frankincense
Please enter the natural products name

GoGO

Search by first letter

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Frankincense
General Information

Frankincense is an aromatic resin that comes from Boswellia trees. The resin is obtained by making a cut in the tree bark, then allowing the resin to leak out of the cut and harden.

Common Name(s)
Bible frankincense, frankincense, incense, olibanum
Scientific Name(s)

Boswellia sacra Flueck. (Burseraceae)

How is Frankincense usually used?

The bark resin is used to make medicine. It may be taken orallyorallyto be taken by mouth (swallowed), applied topicallytopicallyto be applied on the skin, or inhaled. When taken orally, the adult dose of frankincense ranges from 3 g to 8 g of the dry gum resin per day.

Traditional literature suggests frying the resin before taking it.

What is Frankincense used for?

Frankincense taken orallyorallyto be taken by mouth (swallowed) has been used:

In traditional Chinese medicine, frankincense has been used orally to promote circulation of qi (life force or energy flow), to relieve urinary disorders, and to drive away wind-dampness.

Frankincense applied topicallytopicallyto be applied on the skin has been used in traditional Chinese medicine to:

Frankincense has also been applied topically to treat ringworm.

Your health care provider may have recommended this product for other conditions. Contact a health care provider if you have any questions.

What else should I be aware of?

Frankincense may cause mild skin irritation when applied topicallytopicallyto be applied on the skin. When used orallyorallyto be taken by mouth (swallowed), frankincense may cause upset stomach, diarrhea, drowsiness, or liver damage.

Frankincense may interact with some medications including antibiotics (e.g., amoxicillin), antifungal medications (e.g., fluconazole), arthritis medications (e.g., methotrexate), medications to treat cancer (e.g., cisplatin), certain asthma medications (e.g., montelukast), or medications to lower cholesterol (e.g., rosuvastatin).

Do not use frankincense while pregnant or breast-feeding, or if you are allergic to frankincense, Boswellia trees, or any plant from the Burseraceae family.

Talk to your health care provider before using frankincense if you have liver damage or poor liver function, lung disease, autoimmune diseases, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Check with a health care provider before giving frankincense to children.

Before taking any new medications, including natural health products, speak to your physician, pharmacist, or other health care provider. Tell your health care provider about any natural health products you may be taking.

Source(s)
  1. Health Canada.  Licensed Natural Health Products Database.  Frankincense—draft.  http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/dhp-mps/alt_formats/hpfb-dgpsa/pdf/prodnatur/mono_frankincense-arbre-eng.pdf (Accessed June 10, 2011)
  2. Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database. Frankincense. http://naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com/nd/Search.aspx?cs=&s=ND&pt=100&id=448&ds=&name=FRANKINCENSE&searchid=32418326 (Accessed January 30, 2012)
  3. Natural Standard-the Authority on Integrative Medicine. Frankincense. http://3rdparty.naturalstandard.com/frameset.asp (Accessed January 30, 2012)


 


Advertisement


Did you find what you were looking for on our website? Please let us know.

Hot Topics - Bedwetting, Depression, Flu (Seasonal), Healthy Skin, Incontinence, Multiple Sclerosis, Psoriasis, Stroke Risk Reduction

Condition and disease information is written and reviewed by the MedBroadcast Clinical Team.


The contents of this site are for informational purposes only and are meant to be discussed with your physician or other qualified health care professional before being acted on. Never disregard any advice given to you by your doctor or other qualified health care professional. Always seek the advice of a physician or other licensed health care professional regarding any questions you have about your medical condition(s) and treatment(s). This site is not a substitute for medical advice.
© 1996 - 2014 MediResource Inc. - MediResource reaches millions of Canadians each year.