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Condition Info > T > Thyroid Diseases
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Thyroid Diseases



In this condition factsheet:


Diagnosing Thyroid Diseases

Thyroid disease suspected by clinical history and physical exam is confirmed by laboratory tests. Laboratory tests usually measure levels of TSH and thyroid hormones. Serology tests can measure the levels of antibodies associated with hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. If your doctor suspects thyroid cancer, a biopsy can be used to sample the thyroid tissue and test for cancer.

Another method called a functional stimulation test can be used to distinguish whether the pituitary and thyroid glands are the source of medical symptoms. Ultrasounds and nuclear thyroid scans allow for visual and functional examination of the thyroid gland or of nodules.

Treating and Preventing Thyroid Diseases

The usual treatment for hypothyroidism is thyroid hormone replacement therapy. With this treatment, synthetic thyroid hormone (e.g., levothyroxine*) is taken by mouth to replace the missing thyroid hormone. Treatment is usually life-long.

Most people who take thyroid replacement therapy do not experience side effects. However, if too much thyroid hormone is taken, symptoms can include shakiness, heart palpitations, and difficulty sleeping. Women who are pregnant may require an increase in their thyroid replacement by up to 50%. It takes about 4 to 6 weeks for the effect of an initial dose or change in dose to be reflected in laboratory tests.

Hyperthyroidism can be treated with iodine (including radioactive iodine), anti-thyroid medications or surgery.

Radioactive iodine can destroy parts of the thyroid gland. This may be enough to get hyperthyroidism under control. In at least 80% of cases, one dose of radioactive iodine is able to cure hyperthyroidism. However, if too much of the thyroid is destroyed, the result is hypothyroidism. Radioactive iodine is used at low enough levels so that no damage is caused to the rest of the body. It isn't given to pregnant women because it may destroy the thyroid gland of the developing fetus.

Larger doses of regular iodine, which does not destroy the thyroid gland, help block the release of thyroid hormones. It is used for the emergency treatment of thyroid storm, and to reduce the excess production of thyroid hormones before surgery.

Anti-thyroid medications (e.g., propylthiouracil* or methimazole) can bring hyperthyroidism under control within 6 weeks to 3 months. These medications cause a decrease in the production of new thyroid hormones by the thyroid gland. Larger doses will work more quickly, but may cause side effects including skin rashes, nausea, loss of taste sensation, liver cell injury, and, rarely, a decrease of blood cell production in the bone marrow.

Surgical removal of the thyroid gland, called thyroidectomy, is sometimes necessary. It may be required if there are cancerous nodules; if a non-cancerous nodule is causing problems breathing or swallowing; if the person cannot take radioactive iodine or antithyroid medications, or if these do not work; or if a nodule that contains fluid continues to cause problems. Removing the thyroid gland leads to hypothyroidism, which must then be treated with thyroid hormone therapy for the rest of a person's life.

Sometimes your doctor may recommend other medications to help control symptoms of hyperthyroidism, such as shakiness, increased heart rate, anxiety, and nervousness. However, these won't cure thyroid dysfunction.

Treatment for thyroid cancers often involves some combination of thyroidectomy (surgical removal of the thyroid gland), radioactive iodine, radiation therapy (less common), anticancer medications, and hormone suppression.

 


*All medications have both common (generic) and brand names. The brand name is what a specific manufacturer calls the product (e.g., Tylenol®). The common name is the medical name for the medication (e.g., acetaminophen). A medication may have many brand names, but only one common name. This article lists medications by their common names. For information on a given medication, check our Drug Information database. For more information on brand names, speak with your doctor or pharmacist.

References



 

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