Medbroadcast  Powered by MediResource
 Search

Go
 Browse alphabetically
ABCDEFGHIJKLMN
OPQRSTUVWXYZ
HEALTH TOPICS
Family & Child Health
Men's Health
Women's Health
Seniors' Health
Addiction
Allergy
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Arthritis (Rheumatoid)
Asthma
Atrial Fibrillation
Baby Health
Back Health
Bedwetting
Bladder (Overactive)
Brain Health
Cancer
Childhood Vaccinations
Cholesterol
Crohn's & Colitis
Cold and Flu
COPD NEW!
Cosmetic Procedures
Depression NEW!
Diabetes
Digestive Health
Ear Health
Eating Disorders
Eye Health
Flu (Seasonal)
Fertility
Fitness
Healthy Skin
Heart
High Blood Pressure
HPV
Hyperhidrosis
Incontinence
Infection
Kidney Health
Lung Health
Medications and your Health
Menopause
Mental Health
Multiple Sclerosis NEW!
Natural and Complementary Therapy
Nutrition
Obesity
Oral Care
Pain
Pregnancy
Psoriasis
Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA)
Seasonal Health
Sexual Health
Sleep Health
Stroke Risk Reduction
Smoking
Weight Management
Workplace Health
Yeast Infection
All health channels

STAY CONNECTED
RESOURCES
Ask an Expert
Clinical Trials
Find a Specialist
Health features
Human Atlas Videos
News
Tools


Condition Info Drug Info Tests and Procedures Natural Products Ask an Expert Support Groups Clinical Trials
Home Bookmark Page Send to a Friend Sante Chez Nous Subscribe
Condition Info > T > Tendinitis
Please enter the condition name

GoGO

Search by first letter

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Tendinitis

(Tendonitis)


In this condition factsheet:


The Facts on Tendinitis

Tendons are cords of tissue that anchor muscles to bones. They slide back and forth as our muscles contract and our joints flex. To prevent chafing and to keep them in position, the tendons are enclosed in special coverings (sheaths) that are lubricated. When something goes wrong that prevents the tendon from moving smoothly, pain and stiffness result.

When tendons are damaged and inflamed, the condition is commonly known as tendinitis. If the problem is in the lining of the tendon's sheath, it's called tenosynovitis.

Causes of Tendinitis

The most common causes of tendinitis are strain, overexertion, injury, repetitive movements, and sudden or unaccustomed movements. Tendinitis is most common in seniors and middle-aged people, since the tendons of older individuals lack the elasticity of younger people and have sustained hundreds of microscopic tears due to wear and tear over the years.

There are certain diseases that can cause tendinitis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, Reiter's syndrome, lupus, and diabetes. Sometimes, people with gout have uric acid crystals that appear in the tendon sheath that cause friction and tearing. Very high blood cholesterol levels may also be linked with this condition. Quinolone antibiotics (e.g., ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin)* may increase the risk of tendon rupture.

Some common types of tendinitis include the following:

Rotator cuff tendinitis affects tennis players, swimmers, and anyone who frequently lifts their arms above the head and in a forward motion. This causes several shoulder tendons to rub together. Inflammation can set in and, if severe and untreated, may start to erode the tendons. Rotator cuff tendons hold the upper arm bone in the shoulder socket.

Achilles tendinitis involves the strongest tendon in the body, the one that connects the heel to the leg muscles. It's usually caused by running uphill or downhill, jumping, or engaging in sports that require sudden stopping and starting. Wearing shoes with either very soft-padded heels or very stiff soles, especially for someone whose ankles roll in, may also contribute to Achilles tendinitis. Achilles tendinitis requires special care, as the Achilles tendon must handle great force from the upper body. Special caution is especially warranted if the inflammation is due to the quinolone medications mentioned above.

Flexor digital tenosynovitis (trigger finger) may be seen in people with rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. A protrusion or thickening of the tendon catches in the tendon sheath, causing the finger to bend and stick.

De Quervain's tenosynovitis (De Quervain's syndrome) affects the tendon sheaths extending from above the wrist to the thumb. The most common cause is excessive wringing of the wrist or other repetitive movements. In some cases, rheumatoid arthritis may be involved.

Tennis elbow is medically known as epicondylitis, since inflammation occurs at the part of the elbow where the tendon inserts. Of course, it has many other triggers besides tennis.

Symptoms and Complications of Tendinitis

The primary symptom of most types of tendinitis is pain. Some positions or movements can cause a greater degree of pain than others. You may also feel the lack of smoothness in the movement of the affected muscle. Sometimes, the tendon sheath fills with liquid and becomes inflamed. In other cases, it's dry and causes obvious friction when you move. In severe cases, tendons can rupture, causing increased pain and swelling and possibly permanent change in function of the related muscle and joint.

Serious complications of tendinitis and tenosynovitis include contractures (or tightening) of the tendon, scarring (called adhesions), muscle wasting, and disability. The shoulder is the most vulnerable joint since it can freeze up, a condition called "frozen shoulder." What may start out as tendinitis becomes frozen shoulder when adhesions (scars) limit the motion and cause pain when stretching. People do not notice the difference. Keeping inflamed joints flexible through their whole range of motion helps prevent contractures and adhesions. In serious cases, the rotator cuff tendons can tear, which may lead to prolonged weakness and pain the shoulder.

 

Advertisement


Did you find what you were looking for on our website? Please let us know.




 Search for information related to
GO
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
 
Hot Topics - Bedwetting, Depression, Flu (Seasonal), Healthy Skin, Incontinence, Multiple Sclerosis, Psoriasis, Stroke Risk Reduction

Condition and disease information is written and reviewed by the MedBroadcast Clinical Team.


The contents of this site are for informational purposes only and are meant to be discussed with your physician or other qualified health care professional before being acted on. Never disregard any advice given to you by your doctor or other qualified health care professional. Always seek the advice of a physician or other licensed health care professional regarding any questions you have about your medical condition(s) and treatment(s). This site is not a substitute for medical advice.
© 1996 - 2014 MediResource Inc. - MediResource reaches millions of Canadians each year.