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Psoriasis > Learn about psoriasis > What is psoriasis?
Psoriasis
Learn about psoriasis
Know your psoriasis treatment options
Live better with psoriasis
Take control of your psoriasis treatment
What is psoriasis?
Psoriasis causes and risk factors
Psoriasis symptoms
Psoriasis triggers
Diagnosing psoriasis
Psoriasis resources
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What is psoriasis?

Psoriasis is a lifelong disease of the immune system that affects the skin. Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin condition that most commonly causes red skin patches, often covered with silver flaky scales, which form in areas where new skin cells grow faster than normal. Inflammation, pain, and itching can occur. To better understand why this may happen, read "Psoriasis causes and risk factors."

Do you think that you or someone you know may have psoriasis? If so, it could be one or more of the following 5 types of psoriasis:

  • Plaque psoriasis: This is the most common type, affecting about 90% of people with psoriasis. It causes red, raised lesions (plaques) that are usually covered with silvery, shiny scales. The lesions may appear anywhere but are usually found on the knees, elbows, scalp (scalp psoriasis), and torso. They can also be found on skin folds, nails (nail psoriasis), face, palms, and soles of the feet.
  • Guttate psoriasis: This type of psoriasis does not have plaques. Rather, the lesions are small and look like drops, and typically appear suddenly. It affects nearly 10% of people with psoriasis, making it the second most common type. It often develops after a strep throat infection.
  • Pustular psoriasis: Pus-filled, red lesions are the most common symptom of this type of psoriasis. Scales gradually form as the pustular lesions dry up. Pustular psoriasis often appears on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet; although it can appear widespread throughout the body (called generalized pustular psoriasis).
  • Erythrodermic psoriasis: This is a rare form of psoriasis that causes red, inflammatory patches that look like sunburn. It often covers 90% or more of the skin. Erythryodermic psoriasis can be life-threatening and usually requires treatment in the hospital.
  • Inverse psoriasis: Inverse psoriasis, also known as flexural psoriasis, occurs in the folds of the skin (the flexures) such as the armpits, under breasts, between buttocks, and the genitals.

Do any of these descriptions match skin symptoms you have noticed? It is important to identify symptoms and get a diagnosis because psoriasis can have a huge impact on your quality of life. Because psoriasis can be visible to others, those with psoriasis may feel stress and social stigma, and self-esteem can be affected. Psoriasis can end up impacting a person's relationships, work, and school.

And yet, people with psoriasis can effectively treat and manage their condition with the help of their doctor or a dermatologist specializing in psoriasis. Learn more about psoriasis treatment options and the goals of psoriasis therapy and what you can expect from various psoriasis treatments .

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