Medbroadcast  Powered by MediResource
 Search

Go
 Browse alphabetically
ABCDEFGHIJKLMN
OPQRSTUVWXYZ
HEALTH TOPICS
Family & Child Health
Men's Health
Women's Health
Seniors' Health
Addiction
Allergy
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Arthritis (Rheumatoid)
Asthma
Atrial Fibrillation
Baby Health
Back Health
Bedwetting
Bladder (Overactive)
Brain Health
Cancer
Childhood Vaccinations
Cholesterol
Crohn's & Colitis
Cold and Flu
COPD NEW!
Cosmetic Procedures
Depression NEW!
Diabetes
Digestive Health
Ear Health
Eating Disorders
Eye Health
Flu (Seasonal)
Fertility
Fitness
Healthy Skin
Heart
High Blood Pressure
HPV
Hyperhidrosis
Incontinence
Infection
Kidney Health
Low Testosterone NEW!
Lung Health
Medications and your Health
Menopause
Mental Health
Multiple Sclerosis NEW!
Natural and Complementary Therapy
Nutrition
Obesity
Oral Care
Osteoarthritis of the Knee NEW!
Pain
Pregnancy
Psoriasis
Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA)
Seasonal Health
Sexual Health
Sleep Health
Stroke Risk Reduction
Smoking
Weight Management
Workplace Health
Yeast Infection
All health channels

STAY CONNECTED
RESOURCES
Ask an Expert
Clinical Trials
Find a Specialist
Health features
News
Tools


Condition Info Drug Info Tests and Procedures Natural Products Ask an Expert Support Groups Clinical Trials
Home Bookmark Page Send to a Friend Sante Chez Nous Subscribe
Nutrition > Diets and dietary habits
Nutrition
Diet and active lifestyles
Diet and aging
Diet and disease
Diets and dietary habits
Food safety
Heart and Stroke Foundation
Nutrition Month
Summer eating
Supplements and nutraceuticals
What's hot
Research news
4 reasons you should chew more
7 holiday foods to savour - in moderation
7 reasons why oats are awesome
8 bad eating habits to break
Appetite vs. hunger
Nutritional benefits of berries
Bubble tea
Benefits of the Mediterranean diet
Butter or margarine - try neither
B vitamin complex quick facts
View All
Nutrition resources
Related channels
Health features
Health tools
Ask an Expert
Support groups
Related conditions
Natural products
Discussion forums
Quiz yourself



Iron quick facts

What is it? Iron is a mineral found in cells and organs throughout the body, much of it in the red blood cells. Some iron is also stored away in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and muscles.

Why do we need it? Iron helps build proteins in the blood, which transport oxygen throughout the body. And it is this oxygen that gives us the energy we need to function. A person with iron deficiency would lack energy and feel short of breath or irritable.

How much do we need? Infants are born with about a 6-month supply of iron, and so will need much less dietary iron than children and adults. From newborn to six months, babies require only 0.27 milligrams (mg) per day, a requirement easily met with breast milk or fortified infant formula.

At the 7-month mark, daily iron needs increase:

  • 7 months of age to 1 year of age: 11 mg
  • 1 to 3 years of age: 7 mg
  • 4 to 8 years of age: 10 mg
  • 9 to 13 years of age: 8 mg

Adolescent girls and adult women need higher levels of iron to make up for loss during menstruation. Also, women who are pregnant or breast-feeding may require more of the mineral each day.

    Females
  • 14 to 18 years of age: 15 mg
  • 19 to 50 years of age: 18 mg
  • 51 years of age and older: 8mg
    Males
  • 14 to 18 years of age: 11 mg
  • 19 years of age and older: 8 mg

Where is it found? Many types of foods are fortified with iron, including breads, cereals, and juices. Iron from meat sources is absorbed better than from vegetable sources. Other food sources include:

Meats and other animal products

  • dark-meat poultry
  • eggs
  • lean red meat
  • liver
  • oysters
  • salmon
  • tuna

Grains, seeds, legumes

  • almonds
  • brazil nuts
  • brown rice
  • kidney beans
  • lima beans
  • millet
  • oats
  • soybeans

Fruits and vegetables

  • asparagus
  • broccoli
  • dried fruits
  • kale
  • spinach

Amy Toffelmire



Advertisement

Did you find what you were looking for on our website? Please let us know.

Hot Topics - Bedwetting, Depression, Flu (Seasonal), Healthy Skin, Incontinence, Multiple Sclerosis, Psoriasis, Stroke Risk Reduction

Condition and disease information is written and reviewed by the MedBroadcast Clinical Team.


The contents of this site are for informational purposes only and are meant to be discussed with your physician or other qualified health care professional before being acted on. Never disregard any advice given to you by your doctor or other qualified health care professional. Always seek the advice of a physician or other licensed health care professional regarding any questions you have about your medical condition(s) and treatment(s). This site is not a substitute for medical advice.
© 1996 - 2014 MediResource Inc. - MediResource reaches millions of Canadians each year.