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Natural and complementary therapy may sound unfamiliar to some people, but it has been practiced for centuries. Are you thinking about adding massages and acupunctures to traditional biomedicine? You can learn more about its history, basic essentials, and potential health risks and benefits in our Natural and Complementary Therapy Channel.
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I have been diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). What can I do to help reduce the symptoms?
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Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is often described as a "diagnosis of exclusion." This means that a diagnosis is made by ruling out diseases or conditions that the symptoms normally describe, leaving one disease (in this case, IBS) as the most likely diagnosis. Based on your case history and diagnostic testing, there are no physical findings to confirm that diagnosis. But as those with IBS know, there is a definite imbalance going on.

The best thing to do in reducing the symptoms of IBS is to identify what triggers the symptoms. Most commonly, there are two major contributing factors: dietary sensitivities and psychosomatic factors, which are physical symptoms caused by emotional factors. By cleaning up your diet and identifying offending foods, you decrease sensitivities to the digestive tract, allowing emphasis to be put on healing the gut.

Also, by creating awareness to these mental or emotional factors that are creating stress on our body, otherwise known as mind-body connections, we are further able to address these triggers and find a solution. Although these stressors may not always be so easy to resolve, creating awareness of our response to them and learning to work with them will empower us to no longer be affected by them.

The best thing to do is to consult with a naturopathic doctor to help you assess your condition and work with you to bring you to a better state of overall health and well-being.



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